Carol Abraczinskas Headshot

Biography

A graduate of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Carol Abraczinskas began her career as a professional artist in 1989 at the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago, documenting Egyptian and Nubian artifacts. Later that year, she joined Paul Sereno’s team at the University of Chicago, accompanying him on field expeditions to Texas and Niger as a scientific illustrator. Her award-winning drawings have been featured in exhibits at the Field Museum of Natural History and the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, as well as in national magazines and scientific journals such as Science, Nature, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology and National Geographic.

She has contributed her expertise to after-school workshops as well as to graduate classes at the University of Chicago, where she has taught advanced courses in Scientific Illustration since 1994. The Society of Vertebrate Paleontology awarded her the John J. Lanzendorf Paleoart Award for Scientific Illustration in 2000, 2005, and 2008. Recent features on Carol and her work have appeared in Scientific American, The Chicago Tribune, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago Alumni Magazine and O, The Oprah Magazine

Carol is a 2012 graduate of the FBI Chicago Citizens’ Academy.

Left dentary of the crocodyliform Araripesuchus rattoides sp. n. Pencil drawing of isolated left dentary ramus lacking teeth (UCRC PV3). Pencil on paper. A, Dorsal view. B, Ventral view. C, Medial view. Dashed lines indicate estimated edges; hatching indicates broken surface; double-dash pattern indicates matrix. Scale bar equals 1 cm. Abbreviations: ad1, 4, 5, 8, alveoli for dentary tooth 1, 4, 5, 8; asp, articular surface for the splenial; fen, fenestra; fo, foramen; sym, symphysis.

2009 Sereno, P. C. and H. C. E. Larsson. Cretaceous crocodyliforms from the Sahara. ZooKeys 28:1-143. (75)

Left dentary of an undescribed heterodontosaurid from the Lower Jurassic Kayenta Formation of Arizona (from Sereno et al. unpublished). Pencil on paper. A, Lateral view. B, Medial view. Dashed lines indicate estimated edges; hatching indicates broken surface; double-dash pattern indicates matrix. Scale bar equals 5 mm.

Carol's feature article in The School of the Art Institute of Chicago newsletter for spring 2012, Fueled by Fossils.